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ALF in Argentina
Fire Engine Photos
No: 36982   Contributor: Eduardo Martínez   Year: 2013   Manufacturer: American LaFrance   Country: Argentina
ALF in Argentina

I´m very sad to find this former FDNY fire truck (AP 8025) in this state in a truck shop near Buenos Aires. It served in San Luis (a province of Argentina) approximately 8 years from 1999. Photo taken in December 20th, 2013.
Picture added on 22 December 2013 at 07:48
add commentComments:
This was one of 80 American LaFrance 1000 gpm pumpers purchased in 1980 which were delivered late 1980/early 1981.
AP8025 went to FDNY Engine Co 247 at 1336 60th Street in Brooklyn, New York.

Added by Pete Matten on 22 December 2013.
AP 8025 stands for American LaFrance pumper
year 1980 25th unit purchased.

Added by Les Davis on 23 December 2013.
Good to know that after 19 years with FDNY it had a useful "second life" in Argentina for another eight. Last time I saw this pumper it was in reserve service in Mnahattan.

In the early 1980s most of the FDNY fleet were Mack CFs. It was never really clear to me why they bought Alfies for a short time and then either switched back or started their still current policy of buying Seagraves (plus a recent preference for Ferrara units). Most of the cities which bought ALF trucks in those days tended to be very loyal, at laest until they started to be outdated at the end of the 1980s.

Added by Rob Johnson on 17 January 2014.
ES UNA LASTIMA ME DA BRONCA VER ASÍ SEMEJANTE CAMIÓN EN ESE ESTADO NO ES POR LA FECHA NOSOTROS TENEMOS CAMIONES MACK EN EXCELENTE ESTADO Y ACTUALMENTE EN SERVICIO LO QUE DARÍA POR PODER VOLVERLO A LA VIDA

Added by JUAN DOMSKI on 12 May 2016.
Thanks Juan:

There are still quite a few Mack CF units in service in various South American fire services.

They are "hard to kill" and totally deserve their unique reputation for strength and durability. When I lived in New York they were immensely popular with FDNY and most of the surrounding fire departments in New York state, New Jersey and Connecticut. FDNY still operate a handful of MC series Macks in their special purpose fleet, including satellite, foam and hi-rise units.

When the company was bought by Renault, the new management decided it would be too costly to develop a new custom fire engine design, and only two existing prototypes were built. Although the M series and a rebadged Renault continued as fire truck chassis options for few years, Mack has been pretty much dropped out of the fire truck business for many years now.

Added by Rob Johnson on 13 May 2016.
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